Africa: Politics and Societies South of the Sahara

South Sudan: No State, Nowhere

Posted in African Politics, South Sudan by ruben eberlein on July 4, 2016

The latest issue of Blätter des Informationszentrums Dritte Welt (iz3w) is devoted to questions around separatism. I contributed a piece on South Sudan, where the high hopes of the people at the time of independence 2011 have been frustrated by the ruling SPLM. Since 2013, the war between two factions of the SPLM killed tens of thousands and displaced millions. You can download the article as pdf here.

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Book Review: Alex de Waal on the Horn of Africa

Posted in African Politics, Ethiopia, Somalia, South Sudan, Sudan by ruben eberlein on June 2, 2016

My review of Alex de Waal’s recent book, ‘The Real Politics of the Horn of Africa. Money, War and the Business of Power’ has been published in the June issue of Konkret Magazine. You can download the article (German) here.

South Sudan: Horror and Morsels

Posted in African Politics, Global Africa, South Sudan by ruben eberlein on March 18, 2016

Africa-South-Sudan-Clinton-Kiir-Oil-Pipeline-deal-08062012A new UN report details the brutality and the sexualised violence against women and children by factions in South Sudan’s civil war. In the meantime, the Women body of the United Nations invites the spouses of President Salva Kiir and his rival, Riek Machar, to New York to speak about “the role of women in the peace process”. Here is my report. (more…)

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War in South Sudan: No End in Sight

Posted in African Politics, South Sudan by ruben eberlein on December 22, 2015

This week, the International Crisis Group alerted to the possibility of a renewed war in South Sudan. Many low-intensity conflicts and the non-implementation of the August peace agreement support this view. Here is my interview with Alex de Waal about the agreement and the situation in the country. (more…)

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South Sudan: A Conflict Among Racketeers That Killed Thousands

Posted in African Politics, South Sudan by ruben eberlein on September 18, 2015

Salva Kiir, the President of South Sudan, made it explicitly clear: He only signed the peace accord with his opponent Riek Machar late in August because of international diplomatic pressure. Not exactly bright prospects for an end of warfare among the two fractions of the ruling SPLM. As the finances to get dissenters into an elite compact are vanishing, we are likely to see the war to proceed. Here is my text that appeared in the latest issue of Jungle World.

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Hospitality à la Germany: A Compact With Rogue African Rulers

Posted in African Politics, Eritrea, Global Africa, South Sudan, Sudan by ruben eberlein on August 31, 2015

titel_09-932f1118The new issue of Konkret is dedicated to the German and European debate about immigrants. Several articles focus on how the German government tries to limit the possibilities of refugees to ask for asylum. My own text (pdf here) reports about the so-called Khartoum process. The European Union – and especially Germany as a member of the steering committee – plans to cooperate and close a deal with several rogue states in East Africa including Sudan, South Sudan and Eritrea. These contracts aim to block refugees in their countries by way of training of the police, a “strengthening of government institutions” and the establishment of training centres for migration control.

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Killing Fields South Sudan: A War That Pays Off

Posted in African Politics, South Sudan by ruben eberlein on April 25, 2015

Hititel05gh were the expectations of the people in South Sudan when the country gained independence from the Sudan. But the time of peace only lasted a little more than two years. Since December 2013, two fractions of the ruling SPLM/A are at war with each other over power, money and positions. No side of the opponents is interested reaching a lasting peace agreement, because for them, the war pays. It demonstrates also the total failure of the Western mediators which supported the independence of South Sudan as a magic bullet against the decade-long conflict between North and South. Read my text on the subject in the latest issue of Konkret.

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